Iodinated Contrast Media Increased the Risk of Thyroid Dysfunction: A 6-year Retrospective Cohort Study.

Journal: 

J Clin Endocrinol Metab.

publication year: 

2015

publication volume/issue: 

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/JC.2015-2329

First author: 

Third author: 

Correspondence: 

Abstract: 

CONTEXT:
The risks of thyroid dysfunction after iodinated contrast media (ICM) exposure are largely unknown, especially in Asian populations.

OBJECTIVE:
To determine whether ICM exposure in patients with normal thyroid would increase the risk of thyroid dysfunction, including hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

DESIGN:
Retrospective cohort study included a random selection of 1 million people in 2005.

SETTING:
General population in Taiwan Patients: Patients with ICM exposure were identified as cases, while patients without any ICM exposure were selected as controls.

INTERVENTION:
ICM exposure or non-exposure in normal thyroid function patients.

MAIN OUTCOME:
The primary endpoint was the composite risk of thyroid dysfunction associated with ICM exposure.

RESULTS:
A total of 19,642 cases and 78,568 matched controls were recruited in this study. The mean age of ICM exposure and non-exposure were 53.9 and 53.6 years old, and mean follow-up durations were 4.1 and 5.6 years, respectively. After adjustment, patients with ICM exposure had a significantly higher risk of thyroid dysfunction (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.29-1.66). In the subgroup analysis, the adjusted hazard ratios of hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism compared with controls were 1.22 (95% CI 1.04-1.44), and 2.00 (95% CI 1.65-2.44), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:
ICM exposure was associated with higher risk of thyroid dysfunction, including hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.